AI-equipped robots active in precision welding - Nikkei Asian Review Arrow Artboard Artboard Title Chevron Title Chevron Eye Icon Icon Facebook Icon Linkedin Icon Mail Contact Path Layer Icon Mail Menu Burger Positive Arrow Icon Print Icon Search Site Title Title Chevron Icon Tw

The importance of welding as an industrial field goes without saying. But many work sites are hazardous environments, filled with smoke, dust, arc light and weld spatter that pose health and safety risks. The number of young people pursuing careers in welding continues to decline due to the long hours of study and experience needed to become proficient. With many manufacturers facing personnel shortages and high costs, industrial robots are finding their way into the welding trade. At present, there are more than 500,000 industrial robots in use in China, with welding robots accounting for over 35% of the total. Even conservative estimates put the number of welding robots at more than 2 million in the future. The first is their limited flexibility. In cases where product size is not standardized or errors occur, robots are unable to adjust. That sometimes leads to bad welds that harm product quality or make the product unusable. The second involves difficulties with programming. Until now, it has been necessary for skilled human welders to have their actions recorded to give the robot a model to copy. The method was inefficient and meant that the quality of the welds performed ...

Advanced Manufacturing Media is a leading source for news and in-depth technical information about advanced manufacturing

Advanced Manufacturing Media is a leading source for news and in-depth technical information about advanced manufacturing in North America. Maybe your company specializes in aerospace or medical components, and you need to produce complex geometries in metals too tough to cut via conventional machining methods. Or maybe you work in or own a tool and cutter shop, and are looking for faster, more cost-effective ways to produce drills, end mills, and form tools. Whatever the reason, and whatever the requirement, you’re in luck. As with most metalworking technologies, grinding—more properly called abrasive machining—has improved greatly in recent years. How so? For starters, grinding wheel manufacturers have developed new bonds and superabrasives that clearly deserve the title “super,” capable of removing more material in less time than ever before. And grinding machine manufacturers are delivering ever more capable equipment, rigid and powerful enough to take full advantage of those advanced abrasives, while adding smart features like automation, remote monitoring and intelligent software systems to their machine tools. Simply put, grinding has entered a new era of productivity and...