For many, they have been knocked off already. The holdovers among us are hanging tough, but it gets more difficult every day. A.J. Hinch’s pitiful interview with MLB Network, where be took full responsibility for doing nothing to stop his players from cheating, didn’t help. Hinch’s “I wish I had done more” refrain rings hollow in that he didn’t do anything. And it wouldn’t have taken much for him to put a stop to the scheme. We’re talking about a sport where the manager spends more time meeting and talking to players and coaches than he does with anyone. Wife and kids included. And all it would have taken for Hinch to have ended the sign stealing was to speak up in one team meeting. Had he done that, he would still be the Astros’ manager, their pedestal safe. Instead, he is gone, and Monday, two days before pitchers and catchers report to spring training in West Palm Beach, Fla., former pitcher Mike Bolsinger filed a lawsuit alleging his career was collateral damage to the Astros’ 2017 sign-stealing operation. As prepared as I was to be dismissive of the legal action, I am not about to trivialize Bolsinger’s potential pain. While I had no issue ridiculing the Jets fan who sued ...